Credits, Sources, and Disclaimers

This entry is part 27 of 27 in the series Canterbury Tales

I believe in giving credit where credit is due, which, unfortunately, is not the case on many websites these days. Therefore, the sources I have used for this Canterbury Tales section are listed below, with my comments.

Chaucer Editions – Many of the images I have used for illustration throughout this section came from a wonderful website called Chaucer Editions, created by Robert Simola. While he has stated that the collection is incomplete, he has included images from dozens of editions ranging from 1721 to 1930. If you are a Chaucer nut you have probably visited his site. But if you haven’t yet, then you should definitely give it a whirl.


 

Individual credits from Chaucer Editions:

1787 John Mortimer Prints

The Mortimer prints were originally meant for inclusion in an elaborate edition that never materialized.  (See the Betsy Bowden essay, “Tales Told and Tellers of Tales: Illustrations of the Canterbury Tales in the Course of the Eighteenth Century” in Chaucer Illustrated: Five Hundred Years of The Canterbury Tales in Pictures edited by William K. Finley and Joseph Rosenblum.

Saunders, John.  Canterbury Tales, from Chaucer.  In Two Volumes.  London:  Charles Knight and Co., 1845

Richardson, Abby Sage.  Stories from Old English Poetry.  Boston:  Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1871.

Briton Riviere; et al, eds.  Highroads of Literature.  Book III–The Morning Star.  London:  Thomas Nelson and Sons, Ltd., 1919.


The Szyk Images

These beautiful and whimsical depictions of the pilgrims, as well as the header image used for this section, were created by a wonderful Polish artist named Arthur Szyk. I acquired them from various places on the internet, as well as from a book I possess called (put book here.) These images are NOT in the public domain, and I do not have express permission to use them, primarily because I do not know from whom or how to obtain it. I use them under the fair use principle for teaching and scholarship. These images are so beautiful and intriguing that I believe they will help to bring in new readers of the Canterbury Tales. If you are the copyright holder of this material, and you wish for me to remove these images, though it would break my heart to do so, I will remove them from my pages.

Arthur Szyk also made beautiful illustrations for many other books, including Anderson’s Fairy Tales. But as  Polish Jew, he is most famous for his anti-Nazi propaganda posters during the second world war. His prints can often be found being sold on eBay.

 


The Canterbury Pilgrims - Edward Courbould 1884

The Canterbury Pilgrims
Edward Courbould 1884

 

The Yeoman’s Tale – Prose Version

This entry is part 24 of 27 in the series Canterbury Tales

The Knight’s Tale is the story of two knights from Thebes who fall in love with the same woman, a princess of Athens named Emily. Since the two knights have apparently sworn to support each other in everything, each one’s love for Emily does not go over well.

The name of the game in “The Knight’s Tale” is chivalry, a system of rituals, duties, and behaviors a knight was supposed to follow if he wished to behave with honor. The rules of chivalry included things like always keeping your promises, defending the helpless, and remaining loyal to your lord and fellow knights no matter what. Think King Arthur and you’re on the right track.

“The Knight’s Tale” is also concerned with courtly love, which demanded the loyalty of the knight to just one person: his lady-love. Courtly love was actually a “system” of love, just as chivalry was a system of knightly behavior. That means there were rules…for love. The system got its start in the literature of the Aquitaine region in France, where troubadours sang ballads about the often secret and illicit love of knights for noblewomen (scandalous!).

The woman in a courtly love story is placed on a pedestal: she is totally perfect in every way, and the knight practically worships her. In fact, his love for her makes the knight stronger and more honorable. The rules of courtly love were even written down in a treatise by a 12th-century French courtier, Andreas Capellanus, in a work called De Amore, although literary types disagree on whether or not this work is meant to be serious or just a way to make fun of the courtly love tradition.

In any case, we have these two codes of behavior: chivalry and courtly love; and in “The Knight’s Tale” we get to see what happens when the two codes clash. 


The Canon's Yeoman - Arthur Szyk - Although not one of the pilgrims, the Canon appears with his servant (the Yeoman) but leaves when his Yeoman begins a tale

The Canon’s Yeoman – Arthur Szyk
Although not one of the pilgrims, the Canon appears with his servant (the Yeoman) but leaves when his Yeoman begins a tale

Once upon a time, as they say in all the old fairy tales, there was a duke named Theseus who was the ruler of the kingdom of Athens in present-day Greece. His wisdom and his skill at fighting wars had made him the fiercest warrior of his generation. There was no one greater. He’d fought in many wars and conquered many other kingdoms, including even the women warriors of Amazonia, which used to be called Scythia. After defeating the Amazons, Theseus had married their queen, Hippolyta, and took her back to Athens with him along with her little sister, Emily. They traveled back to Athens in a boisterous victory march. And it’s here, on their journey back to Athens, where my story begins.

Oh, I wish I had the time to tell you all about what the kingdom of Amazonia was like before Theseus arrived, and about the great battle between the Athenians and the Amazonians, and the capture of the beautiful and powerful Queen Hippolyta. And I wish I could tell you about their wedding feast and the parties and all the hubbub that their return back to Athens caused along the way. But, God knows, I’m not a great storyteller, and the part I do want to tell you about is long enough without all that. Besides, I want to be fair and make sure that each of us gets a turn to tell a story on the way to Canterbury so that we can see who wins that free dinner! So, let me just start the story where I left a minute ago, with Theseus, Hippolyta, Emily, and the victorious Athenians marching back to Athens.

Now, when the happy and victorious Athenians were just outside the city, Duke Theseus noticed out of the corner of his eye that there was a group of women kneeling in the middle of the road. They were arranged in two columns, dressed all in black, and were crying and wailing at the top of their lungs. You never heard anything like it. They continued wailing until one of them grabbed the bridle of Theseus’s horse.

Divider-Books
This Canterbury Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Arthur Szyk from the Special Edition printed in 1946. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Canterbury Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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Chaucer’s Tales – Prose Version

This entry is part 11 of 27 in the series Canterbury Tales

The Knight’s Tale is the story of two knights from Thebes who fall in love with the same woman, a princess of Athens named Emily. Since the two knights have apparently sworn to support each other in everything, each one’s love for Emily does not go over well.

The name of the game in “The Knight’s Tale” is chivalry, a system of rituals, duties, and behaviors a knight was supposed to follow if he wished to behave with honor. The rules of chivalry included things like always keeping your promises, defending the helpless, and remaining loyal to your lord and fellow knights no matter what. Think King Arthur and you’re on the right track.

“The Knight’s Tale” is also concerned with courtly love, which demanded the loyalty of the knight to just one person: his lady-love. Courtly love was actually a “system” of love, just as chivalry was a system of knightly behavior. That means there were rules…for love. The system got its start in the literature of the Aquitaine region in France, where troubadours sang ballads about the often secret and illicit love of knights for noblewomen (scandalous!).

The woman in a courtly love story is placed on a pedestal: she is totally perfect in every way, and the knight practically worships her. In fact, his love for her makes the knight stronger and more honorable. The rules of courtly love were even written down in a treatise by a 12th-century French courtier, Andreas Capellanus, in a work called De Amore, although literary types disagree on whether or not this work is meant to be serious or just a way to make fun of the courtly love tradition.

In any case, we have these two codes of behavior: chivalry and courtly love; and in “The Knight’s Tale” we get to see what happens when the two codes clash. 


Sir Topas - Arthur Szyk - (Chaucer's Own Tale) A young knight who is handsome, a great hunter, a great wrestler, and the envy of every maiden

Sir Topas – Arthur Szyk
(Chaucer’s Own Tale) A young knight who is handsome, a great hunter, a great wrestler, and the envy of every maiden

Once upon a time, as they say in all the old fairy tales, there was a duke named Theseus who was the ruler of the kingdom of Athens in present-day Greece. His wisdom and his skill at fighting wars had made him the fiercest warrior of his generation. There was no one greater. He’d fought in many wars and conquered many other kingdoms, including even the women warriors of Amazonia, which used to be called Scythia. After defeating the Amazons, Theseus had married their queen, Hippolyta, and took her back to Athens with him along with her little sister, Emily. They traveled back to Athens in a boisterous victory march. And it’s here, on their journey back to Athens, where my story begins.

Oh, I wish I had the time to tell you all about what the kingdom of Amazonia was like before Theseus arrived, and about the great battle between the Athenians and the Amazonians, and the capture of the beautiful and powerful Queen Hippolyta. And I wish I could tell you about their wedding feast and the parties and all the hubbub that their return back to Athens caused along the way. But, God knows, I’m not a great storyteller, and the part I do want to tell you about is long enough without all that. Besides, I want to be fair and make sure that each of us gets a turn to tell a story on the way to Canterbury so that we can see who wins that free dinner! So, let me just start the story where I left a minute ago, with Theseus, Hippolyta, Emily, and the victorious Athenians marching back to Athens.

Now, when the happy and victorious Athenians were just outside the city, Duke Theseus noticed out of the corner of his eye that there was a group of women kneeling in the middle of the road. They were arranged in two columns, dressed all in black, and were crying and wailing at the top of their lungs. You never heard anything like it. They continued wailing until one of them grabbed the bridle of Theseus’s horse.

Divider-Books
This Canterbury Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Arthur Szyk from the Special Edition printed in 1946. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Canterbury Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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Prologue – Prose Version

This entry is part 2 of 27 in the series Canterbury Tales

The Knight’s Tale is the story of two knights from Thebes who fall in love with the same woman, a princess of Athens named Emily. Since the two knights have apparently sworn to support each other in everything, each one’s love for Emily does not go over well. 

The name of the game in “The Knight’s Tale” is chivalry, a system of rituals, duties, and behaviors a knight was supposed to follow if he wished to behave with honor. The rules of chivalry included things like always keeping your promises, defending the helpless, and remaining loyal to your lord and fellow knights no matter what. Think King Arthur and you’re on the right track. 

“The Knight’s Tale” is also concerned with courtly love, which demanded the loyalty of the knight to just one person: his lady-love. Courtly love was actually a “system” of love, just as chivalry was a system of knightly behavior. That means there were rules…for love. The system got its start in the literature of the Aquitaine region in France, where troubadours sang ballads about the often secret and illicit love of knights for noblewomen (scandalous!). 

The woman in a courtly love story is placed on a pedestal: she is totally perfect in every way, and the knight practically worships her. In fact, his love for her makes the knight stronger and more honorable. The rules of courtly love were even written down in a treatise by a 12th-century French courtier, Andreas Capellanus, in a work called De Amore, although literary types disagree on whether or not this work is meant to be serious or just a way to make fun of the courtly love tradition. 

In any case, we have these two codes of behavior: chivalry and courtly love; and in “The Knight’s Tale” we get to see what happens when the two codes clash. 


Once upon a time, as they say in all the old fairy tales, there was a duke named Theseus who was the ruler of the kingdom of Athens in present-day Greece. His wisdom and his skill at fighting wars had made him the fiercest warrior of his generation. There was no one greater. He’d fought in many wars and conquered many other kingdoms, including even the women warriors of Amazonia, which used to be called Scythia. After defeating the Amazons, Theseus had married their queen, Hippolyta, and took her back to Athens with him along with her little sister, Emily. They traveled back to Athens in a boisterous victory march. And it’s here, on their journey back to Athens, where my story begins.

Oh, I wish I had the time to tell you all about what the kingdom of Amazonia was like before Theseus arrived, and about the great battle between the Athenians and the Amazonians, and the capture of the beautiful and powerful Queen Hippolyta. And I wish I could tell you about their wedding feast and the parties and all the hubbub that their return back to Athens caused along the way. But, God knows, I’m not a great storyteller, and the part I do want to tell you about is long enough without all that. Besides, I want to be fair and make sure that each of us gets a turn to tell a story on the way to Canterbury so that we can see who wins that free dinner! So, let me just start the story where I left a minute ago, with Theseus, Hippolyta, Emily, and the victorious Athenians marching back to Athens.

Now, when the happy and victorious Athenians were just outside the city, Duke Theseus noticed out of the corner of his eye that there was a group of women kneeling in the middle of the road. They were arranged in two columns, dressed all in black, and were crying and wailing at the top of their lungs. You never heard anything like it. They continued wailing until one of them grabbed the bridle of Theseus’s horse.

Divider-Books
This Canterbury Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Arthur Szyk from the Special Edition printed in 1946. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Canterbury Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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The Host – Prose Version

This entry is part 3 of 27 in the series Canterbury Tales

The Knight’s Tale is the story of two knights from Thebes who fall in love with the same woman, a princess of Athens named Emily. Since the two knights have apparently sworn to support each other in everything, each one’s love for Emily does not go over well. 

The name of the game in “The Knight’s Tale” is chivalry, a system of rituals, duties, and behaviors a knight was supposed to follow if he wished to behave with honor. The rules of chivalry included things like always keeping your promises, defending the helpless, and remaining loyal to your lord and fellow knights no matter what. Think King Arthur and you’re on the right track. 

“The Knight’s Tale” is also concerned with courtly love, which demanded the loyalty of the knight to just one person: his lady-love. Courtly love was actually a “system” of love, just as chivalry was a system of knightly behavior. That means there were rules…for love. The system got its start in the literature of the Aquitaine region in France, where troubadours sang ballads about the often secret and illicit love of knights for noblewomen (scandalous!). 

The woman in a courtly love story is placed on a pedestal: she is totally perfect in every way, and the knight practically worships her. In fact, his love for her makes the knight stronger and more honorable. The rules of courtly love were even written down in a treatise by a 12th-century French courtier, Andreas Capellanus, in a work called De Amore, although literary types disagree on whether or not this work is meant to be serious or just a way to make fun of the courtly love tradition. 

In any case, we have these two codes of behavior: chivalry and courtly love; and in “The Knight’s Tale” we get to see what happens when the two codes clash. 


The Host (Harry Bailey) - Arthur Szyk - The owner of the Tabard Inn, who volunteers to travel with the pilgrims. He promises to keep everyone happy, be their guide and arbiter in disputes, and judge the tales.

The Host (Harry Bailey) – Arthur Szyk
The owner of the Tabard Inn, who volunteers to travel with the pilgrims. He promises to keep everyone happy, be their guide and arbiter in disputes, and judge the tales.

Once upon a time, as they say in all the old fairy tales, there was a duke named Theseus who was the ruler of the kingdom of Athens in present-day Greece. His wisdom and his skill at fighting wars had made him the fiercest warrior of his generation. There was no one greater. He’d fought in many wars and conquered many other kingdoms, including even the women warriors of Amazonia, which used to be called Scythia. After defeating the Amazons, Theseus had married their queen, Hippolyta, and took her back to Athens with him along with her little sister, Emily. They traveled back to Athens in a boisterous victory march. And it’s here, on their journey back to Athens, where my story begins.

Oh, I wish I had the time to tell you all about what the kingdom of Amazonia was like before Theseus arrived, and about the great battle between the Athenians and the Amazonians, and the capture of the beautiful and powerful Queen Hippolyta. And I wish I could tell you about their wedding feast and the parties and all the hubbub that their return back to Athens caused along the way. But, God knows, I’m not a great storyteller, and the part I do want to tell you about is long enough without all that. Besides, I want to be fair and make sure that each of us gets a turn to tell a story on the way to Canterbury so that we can see who wins that free dinner! So, let me just start the story where I left a minute ago, with Theseus, Hippolyta, Emily, and the victorious Athenians marching back to Athens.

Now, when the happy and victorious Athenians were just outside the city, Duke Theseus noticed out of the corner of his eye that there was a group of women kneeling in the middle of the road. They were arranged in two columns, dressed all in black, and were crying and wailing at the top of their lungs. You never heard anything like it. They continued wailing until one of them grabbed the bridle of Theseus’s horse.

Divider-Books
This Canterbury Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Arthur Szyk from the Special Edition printed in 1946. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Canterbury Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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The Parson’s Tale – Prose Version

This entry is part 26 of 27 in the series Canterbury Tales

The Knight’s Tale is the story of two knights from Thebes who fall in love with the same woman, a princess of Athens named Emily. Since the two knights have apparently sworn to support each other in everything, each one’s love for Emily does not go over well. 

The name of the game in “The Knight’s Tale” is chivalry, a system of rituals, duties, and behaviors a knight was supposed to follow if he wished to behave with honor. The rules of chivalry included things like always keeping your promises, defending the helpless, and remaining loyal to your lord and fellow knights no matter what. Think King Arthur and you’re on the right track. 

“The Knight’s Tale” is also concerned with courtly love, which demanded the loyalty of the knight to just one person: his lady-love. Courtly love was actually a “system” of love, just as chivalry was a system of knightly behavior. That means there were rules…for love. The system got its start in the literature of the Aquitaine region in France, where troubadours sang ballads about the often secret and illicit love of knights for noblewomen (scandalous!). 

The woman in a courtly love story is placed on a pedestal: she is totally perfect in every way, and the knight practically worships her. In fact, his love for her makes the knight stronger and more honorable. The rules of courtly love were even written down in a treatise by a 12th-century French courtier, Andreas Capellanus, in a work called De Amore, although literary types disagree on whether or not this work is meant to be serious or just a way to make fun of the courtly love tradition. 

In any case, we have these two codes of behavior: chivalry and courtly love; and in “The Knight’s Tale” we get to see what happens when the two codes clash. 


The Parson - Arthur Szyk - A very poor but very holy and virtuous religious man who tells a highly moral tale. He gives his scant money to his poor parishioners and tries to live the perfect life and set an ideal for others

The Parson – Arthur Szyk
A very poor but very holy and virtuous religious man who tells a highly moral tale. He gives his scant money to his poor parishioners and tries to live the perfect life and set an ideal for others

Once upon a time, as they say in all the old fairy tales, there was a duke named Theseus who was the ruler of the kingdom of Athens in present-day Greece. His wisdom and his skill at fighting wars had made him the fiercest warrior of his generation. There was no one greater. He’d fought in many wars and conquered many other kingdoms, including even the women warriors of Amazonia, which used to be called Scythia. After defeating the Amazons, Theseus had married their queen, Hippolyta, and took her back to Athens with him along with her little sister, Emily. They traveled back to Athens in a boisterous victory march. And it’s here, on their journey back to Athens, where my story begins.

Oh, I wish I had the time to tell you all about what the kingdom of Amazonia was like before Theseus arrived, and about the great battle between the Athenians and the Amazonians, and the capture of the beautiful and powerful Queen Hippolyta. And I wish I could tell you about their wedding feast and the parties and all the hubbub that their return back to Athens caused along the way. But, God knows, I’m not a great storyteller, and the part I do want to tell you about is long enough without all that. Besides, I want to be fair and make sure that each of us gets a turn to tell a story on the way to Canterbury so that we can see who wins that free dinner! So, let me just start the story where I left a minute ago, with Theseus, Hippolyta, Emily, and the victorious Athenians marching back to Athens.

Now, when the happy and victorious Athenians were just outside the city, Duke Theseus noticed out of the corner of his eye that there was a group of women kneeling in the middle of the road. They were arranged in two columns, dressed all in black, and were crying and wailing at the top of their lungs. You never heard anything like it. They continued wailing until one of them grabbed the bridle of Theseus’s horse.

Divider-Books
This Canterbury Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Arthur Szyk from the Special Edition printed in 1946. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Canterbury Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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The Manciple’s Tale – Prose Version

This entry is part 25 of 27 in the series Canterbury Tales

The Knight’s Tale is the story of two knights from Thebes who fall in love with the same woman, a princess of Athens named Emily. Since the two knights have apparently sworn to support each other in everything, each one’s love for Emily does not go over well.

The name of the game in “The Knight’s Tale” is chivalry, a system of rituals, duties, and behaviors a knight was supposed to follow if he wished to behave with honor. The rules of chivalry included things like always keeping your promises, defending the helpless, and remaining loyal to your lord and fellow knights no matter what. Think King Arthur and you’re on the right track.

“The Knight’s Tale” is also concerned with courtly love, which demanded the loyalty of the knight to just one person: his lady-love. Courtly love was actually a “system” of love, just as chivalry was a system of knightly behavior. That means there were rules…for love. The system got its start in the literature of the Aquitaine region in France, where troubadours sang ballads about the often secret and illicit love of knights for noblewomen (scandalous!).

The woman in a courtly love story is placed on a pedestal: she is totally perfect in every way, and the knight practically worships her. In fact, his love for her makes the knight stronger and more honorable. The rules of courtly love were even written down in a treatise by a 12th-century French courtier, Andreas Capellanus, in a work called De Amore, although literary types disagree on whether or not this work is meant to be serious or just a way to make fun of the courtly love tradition.

In any case, we have these two codes of behavior: chivalry and courtly love; and in “The Knight’s Tale” we get to see what happens when the two codes clash. 


The Manciple - Arthur Szyk - The steward for a law school. Although not as intelligent as the law students, he is clever and shrewd enough to be able to put away some money for himself

The Manciple – Arthur Szyk
The steward for a law school. Although not as intelligent as the law students, he is clever and shrewd enough to be able to put away some money for himself

Once upon a time, as they say in all the old fairy tales, there was a duke named Theseus who was the ruler of the kingdom of Athens in present-day Greece. His wisdom and his skill at fighting wars had made him the fiercest warrior of his generation. There was no one greater. He’d fought in many wars and conquered many other kingdoms, including even the women warriors of Amazonia, which used to be called Scythia. After defeating the Amazons, Theseus had married their queen, Hippolyta, and took her back to Athens with him along with her little sister, Emily. They traveled back to Athens in a boisterous victory march. And it’s here, on their journey back to Athens, where my story begins.

Oh, I wish I had the time to tell you all about what the kingdom of Amazonia was like before Theseus arrived, and about the great battle between the Athenians and the Amazonians, and the capture of the beautiful and powerful Queen Hippolyta. And I wish I could tell you about their wedding feast and the parties and all the hubbub that their return back to Athens caused along the way. But, God knows, I’m not a great storyteller, and the part I do want to tell you about is long enough without all that. Besides, I want to be fair and make sure that each of us gets a turn to tell a story on the way to Canterbury so that we can see who wins that free dinner! So, let me just start the story where I left a minute ago, with Theseus, Hippolyta, Emily, and the victorious Athenians marching back to Athens.

Now, when the happy and victorious Athenians were just outside the city, Duke Theseus noticed out of the corner of his eye that there was a group of women kneeling in the middle of the road. They were arranged in two columns, dressed all in black, and were crying and wailing at the top of their lungs. You never heard anything like it. They continued wailing until one of them grabbed the bridle of Theseus’s horse.

Divider-Books
This Canterbury Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Arthur Szyk from the Special Edition printed in 1946. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Canterbury Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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The Second Nun’s Tale – Prose Version

This entry is part 23 of 27 in the series Canterbury Tales

The Knight’s Tale is the story of two knights from Thebes who fall in love with the same woman, a princess of Athens named Emily. Since the two knights have apparently sworn to support each other in everything, each one’s love for Emily does not go over well.

The name of the game in “The Knight’s Tale” is chivalry, a system of rituals, duties, and behaviors a knight was supposed to follow if he wished to behave with honor. The rules of chivalry included things like always keeping your promises, defending the helpless, and remaining loyal to your lord and fellow knights no matter what. Think King Arthur and you’re on the right track.

“The Knight’s Tale” is also concerned with courtly love, which demanded the loyalty of the knight to just one person: his lady-love. Courtly love was actually a “system” of love, just as chivalry was a system of knightly behavior. That means there were rules…for love. The system got its start in the literature of the Aquitaine region in France, where troubadours sang ballads about the often secret and illicit love of knights for noblewomen (scandalous!).

The woman in a courtly love story is placed on a pedestal: she is totally perfect in every way, and the knight practically worships her. In fact, his love for her makes the knight stronger and more honorable. The rules of courtly love were even written down in a treatise by a 12th-century French courtier, Andreas Capellanus, in a work called De Amore, although literary types disagree on whether or not this work is meant to be serious or just a way to make fun of the courtly love tradition.

In any case, we have these two codes of behavior: chivalry and courtly love; and in “The Knight’s Tale” we get to see what happens when the two codes clash. 


The Second Nun- Arthur Szyk - A very devout nun who, because she believes that idleness leads to sin, begins her story immediately

The Second Nun – Arthur Szyk
A very devout nun who, because she believes that idleness leads to sin, begins her story immediately

Once upon a time, as they say in all the old fairy tales, there was a duke named Theseus who was the ruler of the kingdom of Athens in present-day Greece. His wisdom and his skill at fighting wars had made him the fiercest warrior of his generation. There was no one greater. He’d fought in many wars and conquered many other kingdoms, including even the women warriors of Amazonia, which used to be called Scythia. After defeating the Amazons, Theseus had married their queen, Hippolyta, and took her back to Athens with him along with her little sister, Emily. They traveled back to Athens in a boisterous victory march. And it’s here, on their journey back to Athens, where my story begins.

Oh, I wish I had the time to tell you all about what the kingdom of Amazonia was like before Theseus arrived, and about the great battle between the Athenians and the Amazonians, and the capture of the beautiful and powerful Queen Hippolyta. And I wish I could tell you about their wedding feast and the parties and all the hubbub that their return back to Athens caused along the way. But, God knows, I’m not a great storyteller, and the part I do want to tell you about is long enough without all that. Besides, I want to be fair and make sure that each of us gets a turn to tell a story on the way to Canterbury so that we can see who wins that free dinner! So, let me just start the story where I left a minute ago, with Theseus, Hippolyta, Emily, and the victorious Athenians marching back to Athens.

Now, when the happy and victorious Athenians were just outside the city, Duke Theseus noticed out of the corner of his eye that there was a group of women kneeling in the middle of the road. They were arranged in two columns, dressed all in black, and were crying and wailing at the top of their lungs. You never heard anything like it. They continued wailing until one of them grabbed the bridle of Theseus’s horse.

Divider-Books
This Canterbury Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Arthur Szyk from the Special Edition printed in 1946. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Canterbury Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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The Nuns’ Priest’s Tale – Prose Version

This entry is part 13 of 27 in the series Canterbury Tales

The Knight’s Tale is the story of two knights from Thebes who fall in love with the same woman, a princess of Athens named Emily. Since the two knights have apparently sworn to support each other in everything, each one’s love for Emily does not go over well.

The name of the game in “The Knight’s Tale” is chivalry, a system of rituals, duties, and behaviors a knight was supposed to follow if he wished to behave with honor. The rules of chivalry included things like always keeping your promises, defending the helpless, and remaining loyal to your lord and fellow knights no matter what. Think King Arthur and you’re on the right track.

“The Knight’s Tale” is also concerned with courtly love, which demanded the loyalty of the knight to just one person: his lady-love. Courtly love was actually a “system” of love, just as chivalry was a system of knightly behavior. That means there were rules…for love. The system got its start in the literature of the Aquitaine region in France, where troubadours sang ballads about the often secret and illicit love of knights for noblewomen (scandalous!).

The woman in a courtly love story is placed on a pedestal: she is totally perfect in every way, and the knight practically worships her. In fact, his love for her makes the knight stronger and more honorable. The rules of courtly love were even written down in a treatise by a 12th-century French courtier, Andreas Capellanus, in a work called De Amore, although literary types disagree on whether or not this work is meant to be serious or just a way to make fun of the courtly love tradition.

In any case, we have these two codes of behavior: chivalry and courtly love; and in “The Knight’s Tale” we get to see what happens when the two codes clash. 


The Nuns' Priest - Szyk - The priest of the church who accompanies the Prioress and her nun so that they may offer up their confessions

The Nun’s Priest – Szyk
The priest of the church who accompanies the Prioress and her nun so that they may offer up their confessions

Once upon a time, as they say in all the old fairy tales, there was a duke named Theseus who was the ruler of the kingdom of Athens in present-day Greece. His wisdom and his skill at fighting wars had made him the fiercest warrior of his generation. There was no one greater. He’d fought in many wars and conquered many other kingdoms, including even the women warriors of Amazonia, which used to be called Scythia. After defeating the Amazons, Theseus had married their queen, Hippolyta, and took her back to Athens with him along with her little sister, Emily. They traveled back to Athens in a boisterous victory march. And it’s here, on their journey back to Athens, where my story begins.

Oh, I wish I had the time to tell you all about what the kingdom of Amazonia was like before Theseus arrived, and about the great battle between the Athenians and the Amazonians, and the capture of the beautiful and powerful Queen Hippolyta. And I wish I could tell you about their wedding feast and the parties and all the hubbub that their return back to Athens caused along the way. But, God knows, I’m not a great storyteller, and the part I do want to tell you about is long enough without all that. Besides, I want to be fair and make sure that each of us gets a turn to tell a story on the way to Canterbury so that we can see who wins that free dinner! So, let me just start the story where I left a minute ago, with Theseus, Hippolyta, Emily, and the victorious Athenians marching back to Athens.

Now, when the happy and victorious Athenians were just outside the city, Duke Theseus noticed out of the corner of his eye that there was a group of women kneeling in the middle of the road. They were arranged in two columns, dressed all in black, and were crying and wailing at the top of their lungs. You never heard anything like it. They continued wailing until one of them grabbed the bridle of Theseus’s horse.

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This Canterbury Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Arthur Szyk from the Special Edition printed in 1946. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Canterbury Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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The Monk’s Tale – Prose Version

This entry is part 12 of 27 in the series Canterbury Tales

The Knight’s Tale is the story of two knights from Thebes who fall in love with the same woman, a princess of Athens named Emily. Since the two knights have apparently sworn to support each other in everything, each one’s love for Emily does not go over well.

The name of the game in “The Knight’s Tale” is chivalry, a system of rituals, duties, and behaviors a knight was supposed to follow if he wished to behave with honor. The rules of chivalry included things like always keeping your promises, defending the helpless, and remaining loyal to your lord and fellow knights no matter what. Think King Arthur and you’re on the right track.

“The Knight’s Tale” is also concerned with courtly love, which demanded the loyalty of the knight to just one person: his lady-love. Courtly love was actually a “system” of love, just as chivalry was a system of knightly behavior. That means there were rules…for love. The system got its start in the literature of the Aquitaine region in France, where troubadours sang ballads about the often secret and illicit love of knights for noblewomen (scandalous!).

The woman in a courtly love story is placed on a pedestal: she is totally perfect in every way, and the knight practically worships her. In fact, his love for her makes the knight stronger and more honorable. The rules of courtly love were even written down in a treatise by a 12th-century French courtier, Andreas Capellanus, in a work called De Amore, although literary types disagree on whether or not this work is meant to be serious or just a way to make fun of the courtly love tradition.

In any case, we have these two codes of behavior: chivalry and courtly love; and in “The Knight’s Tale” we get to see what happens when the two codes clash. 


The Monk - Arthur Szyk - A man who tends the property of the monastery. He is fat and happy, loves good food and wine, and finds the taverns more to his liking than the cold, severe monastery

The Monk – Arthur Szyk
A man who tends the property of the monastery. He is fat and happy, loves good food and wine, and finds the taverns more to his liking than the cold, severe monastery

Once upon a time, as they say in all the old fairy tales, there was a duke named Theseus who was the ruler of the kingdom of Athens in present-day Greece. His wisdom and his skill at fighting wars had made him the fiercest warrior of his generation. There was no one greater. He’d fought in many wars and conquered many other kingdoms, including even the women warriors of Amazonia, which used to be called Scythia. After defeating the Amazons, Theseus had married their queen, Hippolyta, and took her back to Athens with him along with her little sister, Emily. They traveled back to Athens in a boisterous victory march. And it’s here, on their journey back to Athens, where my story begins.

Oh, I wish I had the time to tell you all about what the kingdom of Amazonia was like before Theseus arrived, and about the great battle between the Athenians and the Amazonians, and the capture of the beautiful and powerful Queen Hippolyta. And I wish I could tell you about their wedding feast and the parties and all the hubbub that their return back to Athens caused along the way. But, God knows, I’m not a great storyteller, and the part I do want to tell you about is long enough without all that. Besides, I want to be fair and make sure that each of us gets a turn to tell a story on the way to Canterbury so that we can see who wins that free dinner! So, let me just start the story where I left a minute ago, with Theseus, Hippolyta, Emily, and the victorious Athenians marching back to Athens.

Now, when the happy and victorious Athenians were just outside the city, Duke Theseus noticed out of the corner of his eye that there was a group of women kneeling in the middle of the road. They were arranged in two columns, dressed all in black, and were crying and wailing at the top of their lungs. You never heard anything like it. They continued wailing until one of them grabbed the bridle of Theseus’s horse.

Divider-Books
This Canterbury Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Arthur Szyk from the Special Edition printed in 1946. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Canterbury Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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