Fairy Tales From H. C. Andersen, Illustrated by Dugald Stewart Walker, 1914

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Andersen & Walker

I was pleasantly surprised recently to discover an edition of fairy tales by Hans Christian Andersen that I had not previously known, illustrated by an artist that was also not previously known to me, named Dugald Stewart Walker. For me, something like this is like Christmas. I tracked down an online version at Archive.org that had reasonably good scans. The first ones I’d run into were on the Wikimedia commons, and were not as good as those on Archive.org.

This edition was published in 1914, during the Golden Age of Illustration, and Walker’s style reflects all the wonderful Art Nouveau flavor that I dearly love, and I’m sure you will as well.

I immediately set out to enhance and repair the scans, and because the selected stories all had a really cool header image done, I felt they were just perfect for the way I display stories on my site. Because of that, I decided to present the stories in this edition along with Walker’s illustrations, in a series,  just as they appear in the book, whether or not I have presented the story elsewhere. The only differences are my enhancements of the images, and the lack of the frontispiece color plate illustration, because I have not, to date, been able to find a copy that was even good enough to enhance.

Each story will have, by way of introduction, some information about the artist or the story. On this introductory page I am including the book cover, the title page, and the table of contents. I hope you enjoy this presentation.


 

Hans-Christian-Andersen-Cover-Fairy-Tales-From-HCA-Dugald-Stewart-Walker-1914

Hans-Christian-Andersen-Title-Page-Fairy-Tales-From-HCA-Dugald-Stewart-Walker-1914

Hans-Christian-Andersen-Contents-Fairy-Tales-From-HCA-Dugald-Stewart-Walker-1914

The Emperor’s New Clothes

“The Emperor’s New Clothes” (Danish: Kejserens nye Klæder) is a short tale by Hans Christian Andersen about two weavers who promise an Emperor a new suit of clothes that is invisible to those who are unfit for their positions, stupid, or incompetent. When the Emperor parades before his subjects in his new clothes, no one dares to say that he doesn’t see any suit of clothes until a child cries out, “But he isn’t wearing anything at all!” The tale has been translated into over a hundred languages.

“The Emperor’s New Clothes” was first published with “The Little Mermaid” in Copenhagen by C. A. Reitzel on 7 April 1837 as the third and final installment of Andersen’s Fairy Tales Told for Children. The tale has been adapted to various media, including the musical stage and animated film.

Andersen’s tale is based on a story from the Libro de los ejemplos (or El Conde Lucanor, 1335), a medieval Spanish collection of fifty-one cautionary tales with various sources such as Aesop and other classical writers and Persian folktales, by Juan Manuel, Prince of Villena (1282–1348). Andersen did not know the Spanish original but read the tale in a German translation titled “So ist der Lauf der Welt”. In the source tale, a king is hoodwinked by weavers who claim to make a suit of clothes invisible to any man not the son of his presumed father; whereas Andersen altered the source tale to direct the focus on courtly pride and intellectual vanity rather than adulterous paternity.

Andersen’s manuscript was at the printer’s when he was suddenly inspired to change the original climax of the tale from the emperor’s subjects admiring his invisible clothes to that of the child’s cry. There are many theories about why he made this change. Most scholars agree that from his earliest years in Copenhagen, Andersen presented himself to the Danish bourgeoisie as the naïvely precocious child not usually admitted to the adult salon. “The Emperor’s New Clothes” became his expose of the hypocrisy and snobbery he found there when he finally gained admission.

Andersen’s decision to change the ending may have occurred after he read the manuscript tale to a child, or had its source in a childhood incident similar to that in the tale. He later recalled standing in a crowd with his mother waiting to see King Frederick VI. When the king made his appearance, Andersen cried out, “Oh, he’s nothing more than a human being!” His mother tried to silence him by crying, “Have you gone mad, child?”. Whatever the reason, Andersen thought the change would prove more satirical.

“The Emperor’s New Clothes” was first published with “The Little Mermaid” on 7 April 1837 by C.A. Reitzel in Copenhagen as the third and final installment of the first collection of Andersen’s Fairy Tales Told for Children. The first two booklets of the collection were published in May and December 1835 and met with little critical enthusiasm. Andersen waited a year before publishing the third installment of the collection.

Traditional Danish tales as well as German and French folktales were regarded as a form of exotica in nineteenth century Denmark and were read aloud to select gatherings by celebrated actors of the day. Andersen’s tales eventually became a part of the repertoire and readings of “The Emperor’s New Clothes” became a specialty of and a big hit for the popular Danish actor Ludvig Phister.

On 1 July 1844, the Hereditary Grand Duke Carl Alexander held a literary soiree at Ettersburg in honor of Andersen. Tired by speaking various foreign languages and on the verge of vomiting after days of feasting, the author managed to control his body and read aloud “The Princess and the Pea”, “Little Ida’s Flowers”, and “The Emperor’s New Clothes”.

The phrase “emperor’s new clothes” has become an idiom about logical fallacies. The story may be explained by pluralistic ignorance. The story is about a situation where “no one believes, but everyone believes that everyone else believes. Or alternatively, everyone is ignorant to whether the Emperor has clothes on or not, but believes that everyone else is not ignorant.


The Emperor’s New Clothes

 New Clothes" image 1 Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

Hans-Christian Andersen’s “The Emperor’s New Clothes”
From “Eventyr,” 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

Many years ago there was an Emperor so exceedingly fond of new clothes that he spent all his money on being well dressed. He cared nothing about reviewing his soldiers, going to the theatre, or going for a ride in his carriage, except to show off his new clothes. He had a coat for every hour of the day, and instead of saying, as one might, about any other ruler, “The King’s in council,” here they always said. “The Emperor’s in his dressing room.”

In the great city where he lived, life was always gay. Every day many strangers came to town, and among them one day came two swindlers. They let it be known they were weavers, and they said they could weave the most magnificent fabrics imaginable. Not only were their colors and patterns uncommonly fine, but clothes made of this cloth had a wonderful way of becoming invisible to anyone who was unfit for his office, or who was unusually stupid.

“Those would be just the clothes for me,” thought the Emperor. “If I wore them I would be able to discover which men in my empire are unfit for their posts. And I could tell the wise men from the fools. Yes, I certainly must get some of the stuff woven for me right away.” He paid the two swindlers a large sum of money to start work at once.

They set up two looms and pretended to weave, though there was nothing on the looms. All the finest silk and the purest old thread which they demanded went into their traveling bags, while they worked the empty looms far into the night.

“I’d like to know how those weavers are getting on with the cloth,” the Emperor thought, but he felt slightly uncomfortable when he remembered that those who were unfit for their position would not be able to see the fabric. It couldn’t have been that he doubted himself, yet he thought he’d rather send someone else to see how things were going. The whole town knew about the cloth’s peculiar power, and all were impatient to find out how stupid their neighbors were.

“I’ll send my honest old minister to the weavers,” the Emperor decided. “He’ll be the best one to tell me how the material looks, for he’s a sensible man and no one does his duty better.”

So the honest old minister went to the room where the two swindlers sat working away at their empty looms.

“Heaven help me,” he thought as his eyes flew wide open, “I can’t see anything at all”. But he did not say so.

Both the swindlers begged him to be so kind as to come near to approve the excellent pattern, the beautiful colors. They pointed to the empty looms, and the poor old minister stared as hard as he dared. He couldn’t see anything, because there was nothing to see. “Heaven have mercy,” he thought. “Can it be that I’m a fool? I’d have never guessed it, and not a soul must know. Am I unfit to be the minister? It would never do to let on that I can’t see the cloth.”

“Don’t hesitate to tell us what you think of it,” said one of the weavers.

“Oh, it’s beautiful -it’s enchanting.” The old minister peered through his spectacles. “Such a pattern, what colors!” I’ll be sure to tell the Emperor how delighted I am with it.”

“We’re pleased to hear that,” the swindlers said. They proceeded to name all the colors and to explain the intricate pattern. The old minister paid the closest attention, so that he could tell it all to the Emperor. And so he did.

The swindlers at once asked for more money, more silk and gold thread, to get on with the weaving. But it all went into their pockets. Not a thread went into the looms, though they worked at their weaving as hard as ever.

The Emperor presently sent another trustworthy official to see how the work progressed and how soon it would be ready. The same thing happened to him that had happened to the minister. He looked and he looked, but as there was nothing to see in the looms he couldn’t see anything.

“Isn’t it a beautiful piece of goods?” the swindlers asked him, as they displayed and described their imaginary pattern.

“I know I’m not stupid,” the man thought, “so it must be that I’m unworthy of my good office. That’s strange. I mustn’t let anyone find it out, though.” So he praised the material he did not see. He declared he was delighted with the beautiful colors and the exquisite pattern. To the Emperor he said, “It held me spellbound.”

All the town was talking of this splendid cloth, and the Emperor wanted to see it for himself while it was still in the looms. Attended by a band of chosen men, among whom were his two old trusted officials-the ones who had been to the weavers-he set out to see the two swindlers. He found them weaving with might and main, but without a thread in their looms.

“Magnificent,” said the two officials already duped. “Just look, Your Majesty, what colors! What a design!” They pointed to the empty looms, each supposing that the others could see the stuff.

“What’s this?” thought the Emperor. “I can’t see anything. This is terrible!

Am I a fool? Am I unfit to be the Emperor? What a thing to happen to me of all people! – Oh! It’s very pretty,” he said. “It has my highest approval.” And he nodded approbation at the empty loom. Nothing could make him say that he couldn’t see anything.

His whole retinue stared and stared. One saw no more than another, but they all joined the Emperor in exclaiming, “Oh! It’s very pretty,” and they advised him to wear clothes made of this wonderful cloth especially for the great procession he was soon to lead. “Magnificent! Excellent! Unsurpassed!” were bandied from mouth to mouth, and everyone did his best to seem well pleased. The Emperor gave each of the swindlers a cross to wear in his buttonhole, and the title of “Sir Weaver.”

Before the procession the swindlers sat up all night and burned more than six candles, to show how busy they were finishing the Emperor’s new clothes. They pretended to take the cloth off the loom. They made cuts in the air with huge scissors. And at last they said, “Now the Emperor’s new clothes are ready for him.”

Then the Emperor himself came with his noblest noblemen, and the swindlers each raised an arm as if they were holding something. They said, “These are the trousers, here’s the coat, and this is the mantle,” naming each garment. “All of them are as light as a spider web. One would almost think he had nothing on, but that’s what makes them so fine.”

“Exactly,” all the noblemen agreed, though they could see nothing, for there was nothing to see.

“If Your Imperial Majesty will condescend to take your clothes off,” said the swindlers, “we will help you on with your new ones here in front of the long mirror.”

Hans Christian Andersen's "The Emperor's New Clothes" image 2 Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

Hans-Christian Andersen’s “The Emperor’s New Clothes”
From “Eventyr,” 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Emperor undressed, and the swindlers pretended to put his new clothes on him, one garment after another. They took him around the waist and seemed to be fastening something – that was his train-as the Emperor turned round and round before the looking glass.

“How well Your Majesty’s new clothes look. Aren’t they becoming!” He heard on all sides, “That pattern, so perfect! Those colors, so suitable! It is a magnificent outfit.”

Then the minister of public processions announced: “Your Majesty’s canopy is waiting outside.”

“Well, I’m supposed to be ready,” the Emperor said, and turned again for one last look in the mirror. “It is a remarkable fit, isn’t it?” He seemed to regard his costume with the greatest interest.

The noblemen who were to carry his train stooped low and reached for the floor as if they were picking up his mantle. Then they pretended to lift and hold it high. They didn’t dare admit they had nothing to hold.

So off went the Emperor in procession under his splendid canopy. Everyone in the streets and the windows said, “Oh, how fine are the Emperor’s new clothes! Don’t they fit him to perfection? And see his long train!” Nobody would confess that he couldn’t see anything, for that would prove him either unfit for his position, or a fool. No costume the Emperor had worn before was ever such a complete success.

“But he hasn’t got anything on,” a little child said.

“Did you ever hear such innocent prattle?” said its father. And one person whispered to another what the child had said, “He hasn’t anything on. A child says he hasn’t anything on.”

“But he hasn’t got anything on!” the whole town cried out at last.

The Emperor shivered, for he suspected they were right. But he thought, “This procession has got to go on.” So he walked more proudly than ever, as his noblemen held high the train that wasn’t there at all.


Hans-Christian-Andersen-The-Emperors-New-Clothes-Unknown-Artist2

Cultural References

Various adaptations of the tale have appeared since its first publication, including a 1919 Russian film directed by Yuri Zhelyabuzhsky, a 1987 musical starring Sid Caesar, and numerous short stories, plays, spoofs, and animated films.

In 1972, Rankin/Bass Productions adapted the tale as the first and only musical episode of the series “The Enchanted World of Danny Kaye” for the ABC network, featuring Danny Kaye, Cyril Ritchard, Imogene Coca, Allen Swift and Bob McFadden. The television special features eight songs with music by Maury Laws and lyrics by Jules Bass, and combines live action filmed in Aarhus, Denmark, animation, special effects and the stop motion animation process “Animagic” made in Japan.

In 1980, computer scientist C.A.R. Hoare used a parody tale, The Emperor’s Old Clothes, to advocate simplification over embellishment, for clothing or computer sorting algorithms.

In 1985, Jack Herer published the first edition of “The Emperor Wears No Clothes”. This book uncovers the history of industrial hemp through civilization, culminating to a propaganda campaign in the U.S. in the early 20th century. The book is now in its 11th edition.

The 1987 Japanese war documentary film The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On, by director Kazuo Hara, centers on 62-year-old Kenzo Okuzaki, veteran of Japan’s Second World War campaign in New Guinea, and follows him around as he searches out those responsible for the unexplained deaths of two soldiers in his old unit.

In 2010, Chicago Shakespeare Theater commissioned a new family musical version written by Alan Schmuckler and Dave Holstein.


 Harry Clark’s Illustrations of The Emperor’s New Clothes

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Emperor's New Clothers" image 1 from "Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen"- 1910, Harry Clark, Illustrator.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The The Emperor's New Clothers Families"
    From "Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen," 1910
    Harry Clark, Illustrator
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Emperor's New Clothers" image 2 from "Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen"- 1910, Harry Clark, Illustrator.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The The Emperor's New Clothers Families"
    From "Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen," 1910
    Harry Clark, Illustrator
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


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This Fairy Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Walter Crane from the Fairy Tales and Other Stories, 1874. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Fairy Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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Illustrations by Vilhelm Pedersen – Page 4

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Vilhelm Pedersen Illustrations

For the first fifteen years, Andersen’s  fairy tales were published without illustrations. But by 1849 his popularity had grown and a new, five volume collection of his tales was published with 125 illustrations by Vilhelm Pedersen (1820-1859,) a young naval officer who is often portrayed as a cartoonist. The Pedersen illustrations found favor with the author, and, in Denmark today, are considered inseparable from the fairy tales in the same way that the John Tenniel illustrations are for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland or Quentin Blake illustrations are for Roald Dahl’s children’s books .

Woodcuts from Pedersen’s drawings were first produced for a German edition of the tales published by Carl B. Lorck in Leipzig. Andersen’s Danish publisher, C.A. Reitzel, paid Lorck for the rights to the Pedersen illustrations.

Pedersen’s tragically young life was lived during the The Biedermeier period, which refers to an era in Central Europe between 1815 and 1848 during which the middle-class grew and arts appealed to common sensibilities. It is the influence of this era that seems to have made Pedersen’s illustrations so appealing.

In his book, “Foreign H. C. Andersen illustrations,” (1969, pp. 24-25) Erik Dal has this to say:

His style does not interpret the great visions, the biting satire, the frightening supernatural, which now and then play a role in Andersen’s multi-faceted repertory; yet it is fully accepted by his contemporaries…”

In Germany, Biedermeier illustrators such as Otto Speckter and Ludwig Richter flocked to Andersen. Again, Erik Dal has this to say:

 If you ask how often a truly trend-setting group of illustrators in a given country at a given time have worked with Andersen’s fairy tales, then the answer is … only once — in German Biedermeier.

Pedersen died at the age of 39, but his images were included in Andersen editions for many years to come.

 


Please Read Before You Share

Creative-Commons-License-Logo

Pedersen’s original illustrations are now all in the Public Domain. However, my derivatives are not. They are shared under the creative commons license which allows you to use, save, and share my images, with attribution required, for non-commercial purposes only, and without making derivative works from them. The original Public Domain images are available for you to do that if you wish. I do this in the hopes of maintaining the quality of the images as they get shared around the internet. Saving them to Pinterest will allow you to keep the caption. Other places you share may not do this automatically, but please do try to copy the captions whenever you can, so new people seeing them will know where all the credit belongs. Also, please, I beg you, keep the PNG format. Converting to JPG will greatly reduce the quality of the image.


 The Illustrations of Vilhelm Pedersen, in Hans Christian Andersen’s “Eventyr,”

At this point, it has been two years since any collections have been published, but on April 6, 1847, a new series was begun. The first installment, titled Nye Eventyr. Andet Bind. Første Samling (New Fairy Tales. Second Volume, First Collection) included the following five stories:

The Darning Needle – 1847

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Darning Needle" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Darning Needle"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Darning Needle" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Darning Needle"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Old Street Lamp – 1847

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Old Street Lamp" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Old Street Lamp"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Old Street Lamp" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Old Street Lamp"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Neighboring Families – 1847

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Neighboring Families" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Neighboring Families"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Neighboring Families" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Neighboring Families"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

Little Tuck – 1847

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Tuck" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Tuck"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Tuck" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Tuck"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Tuck" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Tuck"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Shadow – 1847

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shadow" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shadow"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shadow" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shadow"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


The second, and last, installment of this collection was released a year later, on March 4, 1844. It was titled Nye Eventyr. Første Bind. Anden Samling. (New Fairy Tales, First Volume, Second  Collection) and included six stories.

The Little Match Girl – 1848

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Match Girl" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Match Girl"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Match Girl" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Match Girl"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Old House – 1848

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Old House" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Old House"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Old House" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Old House"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Old House" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Old House"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Drop of Water – 1848

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Drop of Water" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Drop of Water"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Drop of Water" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Drop of Water"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Happy Family – 1848

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Happy Family" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Happy Family"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Happy Family" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Happy Family"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Story of a Mother – 1848

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Story of a Mother" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Story of a Mother"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Story of a Mother" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Story of a Mother"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Shirt Collar – 1848

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shirt Collar" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shirt Collar"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shirt Collar" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shirt Collar"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


Finally, we have one more single release, The Flax, which was printed for the first time in a new Children’s Eventyr called the Illustrated Magazine for Children, published by Julius Christian Gerson of Copenhagen, Julius Christian Steen and Son Publishing. (The first volume, 1848, p. 5-11)

The Flax – 1848

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Flax" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Flax"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Flax" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Flax"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


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This Vilhelm Pedersen page was designed by Katrina Haney. The page design and some of the contents and images are (c) Katrina Haney 2015. No portion of this page or its contents may be reproduced without prior written permission.

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Illustrations by Vilhelm Pedersen – Page 3

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Vilhelm Pedersen Illustrations

For the first fifteen years, Andersen’s  fairy tales were published without illustrations. But by 1849 his popularity had grown and a new, five volume collection of his tales was published with 125 illustrations by Vilhelm Pedersen (1820-1859,) a young naval officer who is often portrayed as a cartoonist. The Pedersen illustrations found favor with the author, and, in Denmark today, are considered inseparable from the fairy tales in the same way that the John Tenniel illustrations are for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland or Quentin Blake illustrations are for Roald Dahl’s children’s books .

Woodcuts from Pedersen’s drawings were first produced for a German edition of the tales published by Carl B. Lorck in Leipzig. Andersen’s Danish publisher, C.A. Reitzel, paid Lorck for the rights to the Pedersen illustrations.

Pedersen’s tragically young life was lived during the The Biedermeier period, which refers to an era in Central Europe between 1815 and 1848 during which the middle-class grew and arts appealed to common sensibilities. It is the influence of this era that seems to have made Pedersen’s illustrations so appealing.

In his book, “Foreign H. C. Andersen illustrations,” (1969, pp. 24-25) Erik Dal has this to say:

His style does not interpret the great visions, the biting satire, the frightening supernatural, which now and then play a role in Andersen’s multi-faceted repertory; yet it is fully accepted by his contemporaries…”

In Germany, Biedermeier illustrators such as Otto Speckter and Ludwig Richter flocked to Andersen. Again, Erik Dal has this to say:

 If you ask how often a truly trend-setting group of illustrators in a given country at a given time have worked with Andersen’s fairy tales, then the answer is … only once — in German Biedermeier.

Pedersen died at the age of 39, but his images were included in Andersen editions for many years to come.

 


Please Read Before You Share

Creative-Commons-License-Logo

Pedersen’s original illustrations are now all in the Public Domain. However, my derivatives are not. They are shared under the creative commons license which allows you to use, save, and share my images, with attribution required, for non-commercial purposes only, and without making derivative works from them. The original Public Domain images are available for you to do that if you wish. I do this in the hopes of maintaining the quality of the images as they get shared around the internet. Saving them to Pinterest will allow you to keep the caption. Other places you share may not do this automatically, but please do try to copy the captions whenever you can, so new people seeing them will know where all the credit belongs. Also, please, I beg you, keep the PNG format. Converting to JPG will greatly reduce the quality of the image.


 The Illustrations of Vilhelm Pedersen, in Hans Christian Andersen’s “Eventyr,”

At this point, Andersen dispensed with calling his tales “For Children,” recognizing that they were appealiing to everyone, and on  November 11, 1843, a new series was begun. The first installment, titled Nye Eventyr. Første Bind. Første Samling (New Fairy Tales, First Volume, First Collection) included the following four stories:

Angel – 1843

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Angel" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Angel"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Angel" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Angel"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Nightingale – 1843

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Nightingale" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Nightingale"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Nightingale" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Nightingale"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Nightingale" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Nightingale"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Sweethearts – 1843

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Sweethearts" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Sweethearts"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Sweethearts" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Sweethearts"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Ugly Duckling – 1843

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Ugly Duckling" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Ugly Duckling"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Ugly Duckling" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Ugly Duckling"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Ugly Duckling" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Ugly Duckling"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


The second installment of this collection was released a year later, on December 21, 1844. It was titled Nye Eventyr. Første Bind. Anden Samling. (New Fairy Tales, First Volume, Second  Collection) and included only two stories, probably because The Snow Queen is a long one.

The Fir Tree – 1844

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Fir Tree" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Fir Tree"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Fir Tree" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Fir Tree"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Snow Queen – 1844

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" image 4 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" image 5 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" image 5 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" image 7 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" image 8 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


The Elder-Tree Mother was not included in one of these small collections. It was was first published in December, 1844, in Gaea, which I assume is a magazine. Published by PL Møller, and accompanied by one illustration by Lorenz Frolich.

The Elder-Tree Mother – 1844

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Elder-Tree Mother" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Elder-Tree Mother"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Elder-Tree Mother" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Elder-Tree Mother"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


The Nye Eventyr. Første Bind. Tredie Samling (New Fairy Tales, First Volume, Third  Collection,) appeared on April 7, 1845, with the following five offerings:

The Elf Mound – 1845

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Elf Mound" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Elf Mound"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Elf Mound" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Elf Mound"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Red Shoes – 1845

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Red Shoes" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Red Shoes"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Red Shoes" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Red Shoes"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Jumpers – 1845

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Jumpers" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Jumpers"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Jumpers" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Jumpers"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Shepherdess and the Chimney-Sweep – 1845

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shepherdess and the Chimney-Sweep" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shepherdess and the Chimney-Sweep"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shepherdess and the Chimney-Sweep" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Shepherdess and the Chimney-Sweep"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

Holger Danske – 1845

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Holgar Dansk" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "Holgar Dansk"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Holgar Dansk" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "Holgar Dansk"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


Finally, we have another single entry; “The Bell” was published in May, 1845, in a child’s magazine called Maanedsskrift for Children, H.V. Kaalund and Julius Christian Gerson, publishers. It was accompanied by a single illustration by Lehman.

The Bell – 1845

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Bell" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Bell"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Bell" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Bell"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


[page 1] [page 2] [page 3] [page 4] [page 5]

Illustrations by Vilhelm Pedersen – Page 2

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Vilhelm Pedersen Illustrations

For the first fifteen years, Andersen’s  fairy tales were published without illustrations. But by 1849 his popularity had grown and a new, five volume collection of his tales was published with 125 illustrations by Vilhelm Pedersen (1820-1859,) a young naval officer who is often portrayed as a cartoonist. The Pedersen illustrations found favor with the author, and, in Denmark today, are considered inseparable from the fairy tales in the same way that the John Tenniel illustrations are for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland or Quentin Blake illustrations are for Roald Dahl’s children’s books .

Woodcuts from Pedersen’s drawings were first produced for a German edition of the tales published by Carl B. Lorck in Leipzig. Andersen’s Danish publisher, C.A. Reitzel, paid Lorck for the rights to the Pedersen illustrations.

Pedersen’s tragically young life was lived during the The Biedermeier period, which refers to an era in Central Europe between 1815 and 1848 during which the middle-class grew and arts appealed to common sensibilities. It is the influence of this era that seems to have made Pedersen’s illustrations so appealing.

In his book, “Foreign H. C. Andersen illustrations,” (1969, pp. 24-25) Erik Dal has this to say:

His style does not interpret the great visions, the biting satire, the frightening supernatural, which now and then play a role in Andersen’s multi-faceted repertory; yet it is fully accepted by his contemporaries…”

In Germany, Biedermeier illustrators such as Otto Speckter and Ludwig Richter flocked to Andersen. Again, Erik Dal has this to say:

 If you ask how often a truly trend-setting group of illustrators in a given country at a given time have worked with Andersen’s fairy tales, then the answer is … only once — in German Biedermeier.

Pedersen died at the age of 39, but his images were included in Andersen editions for many years to come.

 


Please Read Before You Share

Creative-Commons-License-Logo

Pedersen’s original illustrations are now all in the Public Domain. However, my derivatives are not. They are shared under the creative commons license which allows you to use, save, and share my images, with attribution required, for non-commercial purposes only, and without making derivative works from them. The original Public Domain images are available for you to do that if you wish. I do this in the hopes of maintaining the quality of the images as they get shared around the internet. Saving them to Pinterest will allow you to keep the caption. Other places you share may not do this automatically, but please do try to copy the captions whenever you can, so new people seeing them will know where all the credit belongs. Also, please, I beg you, keep the PNG format. Converting to JPG will greatly reduce the quality of the image.


 The Illustrations of Vilhelm Pedersen, in Hans Christian Andersen’s “Eventyr,”

On October 2, 1838, another collection was started with Eventyr, fortalte for Børn. Ny Samling. Første Hefte (Fairy Tales , Told for Children . New Collection, First Booklet,) which included the following three stories:

The Daisy – 1838

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Daisy" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Daisy"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Daisy" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Daisy"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Steadfast Tin Soldier – 1838

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Wild Swans – 1838

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Wild Swans" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Wild Swans"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Wild Swans" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Wild Swans"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Wild Swans" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Wild Swans"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Wild Swans" image 4 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Wild Swans"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


 The second installment of this collection was released a year later, on October 19, 1839. It was titled Eventyr, fortalte for Børn. Ny Samling. Andet Hefte (Fairy Tales , Told for Children. New Collection, Second booklet.) It included the following three stories:

The Garden of Paradise – 1839

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Garden of Paradise" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Garden of Paradise"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Garden of Paradise" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Garden of Paradise"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Garden of Paradise" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Garden of Paradise"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Flying Trunk- 1839

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Flying Trunk" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Flying Trunk"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Flying Trunk" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Flying Trunk"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Storks- 1839

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Storks" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Storks"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Storks" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Storks"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


Finally, two years later, the third and last set in this series was released on December 20, 1841, just in time for Christmas. This booklet contained the following four stories:

The Rose Elf – 1841

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Rose Elf" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Rose Elf"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Rose Elf" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Rose Elf"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

Ole Luk Oie – 1841

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie" image 4 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie" image 5 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie" image 6 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie" image 7 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie" image 8 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie" image 9 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Ole Luke Oie"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Swineherd – 1841

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Swineherd" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Swineherd"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Swineherd" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Swineherd"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Swineherd" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Swineherd"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Buckwheat – 1841

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Buckwheat" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Buckwheat"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Buckwheat" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist.

    Hans Christian Andersen's "The Buckwheat"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist, Dalziel Brothers, Engravers
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


Divider-Books

This Vilhelm Pedersen page was designed by Katrina Haney. The page design and some of the contents and images are (c) Katrina Haney 2015. No portion of this page or its contents may be reproduced without prior written permission.

Divider-Line

The Tallow Candle

I told you about the discovery of Hans Christian Andersen’s first fairy tale, The Tallow Candle. Here it is for your enjoyment. 🙂


It sizzled and fizzled as the flames fired the cauldron.. it was the Tallow Candle’s cradle – and out of the warm cradle came a flawless candle; solid, shining white and slim it was formed in a way that made everyone who saw it believe that it was a promise of a bright and radiant future – promises that everyone who looked on believed it would really want to keep and fulfil.

The sheep – a fine little sheep – was the candle’s mother, and the melting pot its father. Its mother had given it a shiny white body and an inkling about life, but from its father it had been given a craving for the flaming fire that would eventually go through its marrow and bone and shine for it in life.

That’s how it was born and had grown; and with the best and brightest anticipation cast itself into existence. There it met so many, many strange creations that it became involved with, wanting to learn about life – and perhaps find the place where it would best fit in. But it had too much faith in the world that only cared about itself, and not at all about the Tallow Candle. A world that failed to understand the value of the candle, and thus tried to use it for its own benefit, holding the candle wrongly; black fingers leaving bigger and bigger blemishes on its pristine white innocence which eventually faded away, completely covered by the dirt of a surrounding world that had come much too close; much closer than the candle could endure, as it had been unable to tell grime from purity – although it remained pristine and unspoiled inside.

False friends found they could not reach its inner self and angrily cast the candle away as useless.

The filthy outer shell kept all the good away – scared as they were to be tainted with grime and blemishes – and they stayed away.

So there was the poor Tallow Candle, solitary and left alone, at a loss at what to do. Rejected by the good, it now realised it had only been a tool to further the wicked. It felt so unbelievably unhappy, because it had spent its life to no good end – in fact it had perhaps sullied the better parts of its surroundings. It just could not determine why it had been created or where it belonged; why it had been put on this earth – perhaps to end up ruining itself and others.

More and more, and deeper and deeper, it contemplated – but the more it considered itself, the more despondent it became, finding nothing good, no real substance for itself, no real goal for the existence it had been given at its birth. As if the grimy cape had also covered its eyes.

But then it met a little flame, a tinder box. It knew the candle better than the Tallow Candle knew itself. The tinder box had such a clear view – straight through the outer shell – and inside it found so much good. It came closer and there was bright expectation in the candle – it lit and its heart melted.

Out burst the flame, like the triumphant torch of a blissful wedding. Light burst out bright and clear all around, bathing the way forward with light for its surroundings – its true friends – who were now able to seek truth in the glow of the candle.

The body too was strong enough to give sustenance to the fiery flame. One drop upon another, like the seeds of a new life, trickled round and chubby down the candle, covering the old grime with their bodies.

They were not just the bodily, but also the spiritual issue of the marriage.

And the Tallow Candle had found its right place in life – and shown that it was a real candle, and went on to shine for many a year, pleasing itself and the other creations around it.

H.C. Andersen.

 

First Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tale Discovered

While I was browsing the internet today doing my Hans Christian Andersen research, I came across a very interesting article. Apparently, a brand new fairy tale, written by Andersen has been discovered and authenticated, estimated to have been written while he was in his late teens, well before he made his first foray into writing, and certainly well before he had previously been known to be interested in fairy tales. The news broke in December, 2012.

The ink-written manuscript was titled “Tællelyset” (The Tallow Candle),  and was found by local historian Esben Brage at the bottom of an archive box. Brage made the discovery in October (of 2012) in the historical archive on the island of Funen, where the Danish author was born.

Two months later, historians confirmed that the six-page manuscript was indeed written by Andersen. They dated the document to the mid-1820s, when the writer was in his late teens.

“I am in no doubt that it has been written by Andersen,” Ejnar Stig Askgaard of the Odense City Museum told the Danish daily Politiken.

The newspaper has translated and published a version of the story in English.

The front page of the document reads “To Madam Bunkeflod from her devoted H.C. Andersen.”

Mme Bunkeflod was a vicar’s widow who lived across from Andersen’s childhood home. Historians know that the writer visited her often as a child, borrowing her books.

“The fairy tale was a present. A present of thanks to a woman whose home had been very important to him,” Askgaard said.

The Bunkeflod family then sent the manuscript to another family close to Andersen, the Plum family, in whose archives the story was found. A dedication written on the document later in blue ink reads: “To P Plum from his friend Bunkeflod.”

Experts believe that the neatly written document is likely the copy of an original manuscript that has since been lost.

The story is about a neglected and dirty tallow candle which finds happiness when a tinder box sees its inner beauty and lights its wick.

“The Tallow Candle had found its rightful place in life – had shown that it was a real candle, and went on to shine for many a year, pleasing itself and the other creations around it,” Andersen wrote.

Although the tale is not at the level of Andersen’s later works, it is the most important find since the 1920’s, when the writer’s memoirs were discovered at the Royal Library.

“This is a sensational discovery. Partly because it must be seen as Andersen’s first fairy tale, and partly because it shows that he was interested in the fairy tale as a young man, before his authorship began,”Askgaard said.

Andersen’s first fairy tales were published in 1835. He went on to write some 160 stories, including classics like The Ugly Duckling, The Little Mermaid, The Emperor’s New Clothes and The Little Match Girl that have been translated into more than 100 languages.

 

Illustrations by Vilhelm Pedersen – Page 1

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Vilhelm Pedersen Illustrations
Vilhelm Pedersen Hans Christian Andersen's First Illustrator

Vilhelm Pedersen
Hans Christian Andersen’s First Illustrator

For the first fifteen years, Andersen’s  fairy tales were published without illustrations. But by 1849 his popularity had grown and a new, five volume collection of his tales was published with 125 illustrations by Vilhelm Pedersen (1820-1859,) a young naval officer who is often portrayed as a cartoonist. The Pedersen illustrations found favor with the author, and, in Denmark today, are considered inseparable from the fairy tales in the same way that the John Tenniel illustrations are for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland or Quentin Blake illustrations are for Roald Dahl’s children’s books .

Woodcuts from Pedersen’s drawings were first produced for a German edition of the tales published by Carl B. Lorck in Leipzig. Andersen’s Danish publisher, C.A. Reitzel, paid Lorck for the rights to the Pedersen illustrations.

Pedersen’s tragically young life was lived during the The Biedermeier period, which refers to an era in Central Europe between 1815 and 1848 during which the middle-class grew and arts appealed to common sensibilities. It is the influence of this era that seems to have made Pedersen’s illustrations so appealing.

In his book, “Foreign H. C. Andersen illustrations,” (1969, pp. 24-25) Erik Dal has this to say:

His style does not interpret the great visions, the biting satire, the frightening supernatural, which now and then play a role in Andersen’s multi-faceted repertory; yet it is fully accepted by his contemporaries…”

In Germany, Biedermeier illustrators such as Otto Speckter and Ludwig Richter flocked to Andersen. Again, Erik Dal has this to say:

 If you ask how often a truly trend-setting group of illustrators in a given country at a given time have worked with Andersen’s fairy tales, then the answer is … only once — in German Biedermeier.

Pedersen died at the age of 39, but his images were included in Andersen editions for many years to come.


Please Read Before You Share

Creative-Commons-License-Logo

Pedersen’s original illustrations are now all in the Public Domain. However, my derivatives are not. They are shared under the creative commons license which allows you to use, save, and share my images, with attribution required, for non-commercial purposes only, and without making derivative works from them. The original Public Domain images are available for you to do that if you wish. I do this in the hopes of maintaining the quality of the images as they get shared around the internet. Saving them to Pinterest will allow you to keep the caption. Other places you share may not do this automatically, but please do try to copy the captions whenever you can, so new people seeing them will know where all the credit belongs. Also, please, I beg you, keep the PNG format. Converting to JPG will greatly reduce the quality of the image.


 The Illustrations of Vilhelm Pedersen, in Hans Christian Andersen’s “Eventyr,”

 The first four tales presented here were published together in a small booklet called Eventyr, fortalte for Børn. Første Samling. Første Hefte (Fairy Tales , Told for Children . First Collection, first booklet) on May 8, 1835.

In a letter (dated March 16th, 1835) to Henriette Wulff, HCA mentions that he has just written some fairy-tales, and that H.C. Ørsted has told him:

“that if The Improvisatore brings me fame, then the fairy-tales will immortalise me. Of all my writing, they are the most accomplished, but I do not agree”.

The Tinderbox – 1835

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Tinderbox" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist, Dalziel Brothers, engravers

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Tinderbox"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Tinderbox" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist, Dalziel Brothers, engravers

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Tinderbox"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

Little Klaus and Big Klaus – 1835

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Klaus and Big Klaus" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist, Dalziel Brothers, engravers

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Little Klaus and Big Klaus"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Klaus and Big Klaus" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist, Dalziel Brothers, engravers

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Little Klaus and Big Klaus"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Klaus and Big Klaus" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist, Dalziel Brothers, engravers

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Little Klaus and Big Klaus"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Princess and the Pea – 1835

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Princess and the Pea" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist, Dalziel Brothers, engravers

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Princess and the Pea"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Princess and the Pea" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist, Dalziel Brothers, engravers

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Princess and the Pea"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

Little Ida’s Flowers – 1835

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Ida's Flowers" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist, Dalziel Brothers, engravers

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Little Ida's Flowers"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Ida's Flowers" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist, Dalziel Brothers, engravers

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Little Ida's Flowers"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


The next  publication, Eventyr, fortalte for Børn. Andet Hefte (Tales, Told for Children. Second Booklet) followed shortly thereafter, on Dec 16, 1835, with the following three stories.

Thumbelina – 1835

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Thumbelina" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Thumbelina"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Thumbelina" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Thumbelina"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "Thumbelina" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "Thumbelina"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Naughty Boy – 1835

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Naughty Boy" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Naughty Boy"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Naughty Boy" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Naughty Boy"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Traveling Companion – 1835

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Traveling Companion" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Traveling Companion"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Traveling Companion" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Traveling Companion"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Traveling Companion" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Traveling Companion"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Traveling Companion" image 4 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Traveling Companion"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


The third booklet of this first series included “The Little Mermaid” and “The Emperor’s New Clothes.” It was titled Eventyr, fortalte for Børn. Første Samling. Tredie Hefte (Tales, Told for Children. First Series, Third Booklet) and was released on April 7, 1837.

The Little Mermaid – 1837

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid" image 1 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid" image 2 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid" image 3 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid" image 4 from "Eventyr"- 1850, Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

The Emperor’s New Clothes – 1837

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Emperor's New Clothes" image 1 Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Emperor's New Clothes"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.

  • Hans Christian Andersen's "The Emperor's New Clothes" image 2 Vilhelm Pedersen, artist

    Hans-Christian Andersen's "The Emperor's New Clothes"
    From "Eventyr," 1850
    Vilhelm Pedersen, Artist
    From a gallery on Katrinahaney.com.


Divider-Books

This Vilhelm Pedersen page was designed by Katrina Haney. The page design and some of the contents and images are (c) Katrina Haney 2015. No portion of this page or its contents may be reproduced without prior written permission.

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Little Claus and Big Claus

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Hans Christian Anderson

 

I hope you enjoy this series as much as I am enjoying putting it together for you. I can’t in all honesty hope you enjoy all of the stories. Enjoy, no! Study, yes! Appreciate, yes! Appreciate them for the place they have in our literary history, and for what we can glean of the times in which they were written and popular. Some of them are actually enjoyable. But never read one to your children that you haven’t read for yourself yet.


Little Claus and Big Claus

 

In a village there lived two men who had the self-same name. Both were named Claus. But one of them owned four horses, and the other owned only one horse; so to distinguish between them people called the man who had four horses Big Claus, and the man who had only one horse Little Claus. Now I’ll tell you what happened to these two, for this is a true story.

The whole week through, Little Claus had to plow for Big Claus and lend him his only horse. In return, Big Claus lent him all four of his horses, but only for one day a week and that had to be Sunday.

Each Sunday how proudly Little Claus cracked his whip over all the five horses, which were as good as his own on that day. How brightly the sun shone. How merry were the church bells that rang in the steeple. How well dressed were all the people who passed him with hymn books tucked under their arms. And as they went their way to church, to hear the parson preach, how the people did stare to see Little Claus plowing with all five horses. This made him feel so proud that he would crack his whip and hollo, “Get up, all my horses.”

“You must not say that,” Big Claus told him. “You know as well as I do that only one of those horses is yours.” But no sooner did another bevy of churchgoers come by than Little Claus forgot he mustn’t say it, and holloed, “Get up, all my horses.”

“Don’t you say that again,” Big Claus told him. “If you do, I’ll knock your horse down dead in his traces, and that will be the end of him.”

“You won’t catch me saying it again,” Little Claus promised. But as soon as people came by, nodding to him and wishing him “Good morning,” he was so pleased and so proud of how grand it looked to have five horses plowing his field, that he holloed again, “Get up, all my horses!”

“I’ll get up your horse for you,” Big Claus said, and he snatched up a tethering mallet, and he knocked Little Claus’s one and only horse on the head so hard that it fell down dead.

“Now I haven’t any horse at all,” said Little Claus, and he began to cry. But by and by he skinned his dead horse and hung the hide to dry in the wind. Then he crammed the dry skin in a sack, slung it up over his shoulder, and set out to sell it in the nearest town.

It was a long way to go, and he had to pass through a dark, dismal forest. Suddenly a terrible storm came up, and he lost his way. Before he could find it again, evening overtook him. The town was still a long way off, and he had come too far to get back home before night.

Not far from the road he saw a large farmhouse. The shutters were closed, but light showed through a crack at the top of the windows. “Maybe they’ll let me spend the night here,” Little Claus thought, as he went to the door and knocked.

The farmer’s wife opened it, but when she heard what he wanted she told him to go away. She said her husband wasn’t home, and she wouldn’t have any strangers in the house.

“Then I’ll have to sleep outside,” Little Claus decided, as she slammed the door in his face.

Near the farmhouse stood a large haystack, leading up to the thatched roof of a shed which lay between it and the house. “That’s where I’ll sleep,” said Little Claus when he noticed the thatch. “It will make a wonderful bed. All I hope is that the stork doesn’t fly down and bite my legs.” For a stork was actually standing guard on the roof where it had a nest.

So Little Claus climbed to the roof of the shed. As he turned over to make himself comfortable, he discovered that the farmhouse shutters didn’t come quite to the top of the windows, and he could see over them. He could see into a room where a big table was spread with wine and roast meat and a delicious fish. The farmer’s wife and the sexton were sitting there at the table, all by themselves. She kept helping him to wine, and he kept helping himself to fish. He must have loved fish.

“Oh, if only I could have some too,” thought Little Claus. By craning his neck toward the window he caught sight of a great, appetizing cake. Why, they were feasting in there!

Just then he heard someone riding down the road to the house. It was the farmer coming home. He was an excellent man except for just one thing. He could not stand the sight of a sexton. If he so much as caught a glimpse of one, he would fly into a furious rage, which was the reason why the sexton had gone to see the farmer’s wife while her husband was away from home, and the good woman could do no less than set before him all the good things to eat that she had in the house. When she heard the farmer coming, she trembled for the sexton, and begged him to creep into a big empty chest which stood in one corner of the room. He lost no time about it, because he knew full well that her poor husband couldn’t stand the sight of a sexton. The woman quickly set aside the wine and hid the good food in her oven, because if her husband had seen the feast he would have asked questions hard to answer.

“Oh dear!” Up on the shed Little Claus sighed to see all the good food disappearing.

“Who’s up there?” the farmer peered at Little Claus. “Whatever are you doing up there? Come into the house with me.” So Little Claus came down. He told the farmer how he had lost his way, and asked if he could have shelter for the night.

“Of course,” said the farmer, “but first let’s have something to eat.”

The farmer’s wife received them well, laid the whole table, and set before them a big bowl of porridge. The farmer was hungry and ate it with a good appetite, but Little Claus was thinking about the good roast meat, that fish and that cake in the oven. Beside his feet under the table lay his sack with the horsehide, for as we know he was on his way to sell it in the town. Not liking the porridge at all, Little Claus trod on the sack, and the dry hide gave a loud squeak.

“Sh!” Little Claus said to his sack, at the same time that he trod on it so hard that it squeaked even louder.

“What on earth have you got in there?” said the farmer.

“Oh, just a conjuror,” said Little Claus. “He tells me we don’t have to eat porridge, because he has conjured up a whole oven-full of roast meat, fish, and cake for us.”

“What do you say?” said the farmer. He made haste to open the oven, where he found all the good dishes. His wife had hidden them there, but he quite believed that they had been conjured up by the wizard in the sack. His wife didn’t dare open her mouth as she helped them to their fill of meat, fish and cake.

Then Little Claus trod upon the sack to make it squeak again.

“What does he say now?” asked the farmer.

“He says,” Little Claus answered, “that there are three bottles of wine for us in the corner by the oven.”

So the woman had to bring out the wine she had hidden. The farmer drank it till he grew merry, and wanted to get himself a conjuror just like the one Little Claus carried in his sack.

“Can he conjure up the devil?” the farmer wondered. “I’m in just the mood to meet him.”

“Oh, yes,” said Little Claus. “My conjuror can do anything I tell him. Can’t you?” he asked and trod upon the sack till it squeaked. “Did you hear him answer? He said ‘Yes.’ He can conjure up the devil, but he’s afraid we won’t like the look of him.”

“Oh, I’m not afraid. What’s he like?”

“Well, he looks an awful lot like a sexton.”

“Ho,” said the farmer, “as ugly as that? I can’t bear the sight of a sexton. But don’t let that stop us. Now that I know it’s just the devil I shan’t mind it so much. I’ll face him, provided he doesn’t come near me.”

“Wait, while I talk with my conjuror.” Little Claus trod on the sack and stooped down to listen.

“What does he say?”

“He says for you to go and open that big chest in the corner, and there you’ll find the devil doubled up inside it. But you must hold fast to the lid, so he doesn’t pop out.”

“Will you help me hold it?” said the farmer. He went to the chest in which his wife had hidden the sexton-once frightened, now terrified. The farmer lifted the lid a little, and peeped in.

“Ho!” he sprang back. “I saw him, and he’s the image of our sexton, a horrible sight!” After that they needed another drink, and sat there drinking far into the night.

“You must sell me your conjuror,” said the farmer. “You can fix your own price. I’d pay you a bushel of money right away.”

“Oh, I couldn’t do that,” Little Claus said. “Just think how useful my conjuror is.”

“But I’d so like to have him.” The farmer kept begging to buy it.

“Well,” said Little Claus at last, “you’ve been kind enough to give me a night’s lodging, so I can’t say no. You shall have my sack for a bushel of money, but it must be full to the brim.”

“You shall have it”, said the farmer. “But you must take that chest along with you too. I won’t have it in the house another hour. He might still be inside it. You never can tell.”

So Little Claus sold his sack with the dried horsehide in it, and was paid a bushel of money, measured up to the brim. The farmer gave him a wheelbarrow too, in which to wheel away the money and the chest.

“Fare you well,” said Little Claus, and off he went with his money and his chest with the sexton in it. On the further side of the forest was a deep, wide river, where the current ran so strong that it was almost impossible to swim against it. A big new bridge had been built across the river, and

When Little Claus came to the middle of it he said, very loud so the sexton could hear him:

“Now what would I be doing with this silly chest? It’s as heavy as stone, and I’m too tired to wheel it any further. So I’ll throw it in the river, and if it drifts down to my house, well and good, but if it sinks I haven’t lost much.” Then he tilted the chest a little, as if he were about to tip it into the river.

“Stop! Don’t!” the sexton shouted inside. “Let me get out first.”

“Oh,” said Little Claus pretending to be frightened, “is he still there? Then I’d better throw him into the river and drown him.”

“Oh no, don’t do that to me!” the sexton shouted. “I’d give a bushel of money to get out of this.”

“Why, that’s altogether different,” said Little Claus, opening the chest. The sexton popped out at once, pushed the empty chest into the water and hurried home to give Little Claus a bushel of money. What with the farmer’s bushel and the sexton’s bushel, Little Claus had his wheelbarrow quite full.

“I got a good price for my horse,” he said when he got home and emptied all the money in a heap on the floor of his room. “How Big Claus will fret when he finds out that my one horse has made me so rich, but I won’t tell him how I managed it.” Then he sent a boy to borrow a bushel measure from Big Claus.

“Whatever would he want with it?” Big Claus wondered, and smeared pitch on the bottom of the bushel so that a little of what he measured would stick to it. And so it happened that when he got his measure back he found three newly minted pieces of silver stuck to it.

“What’s this?” Big Claus ran to see Little Claus. “Where did you get so much money?”

“Oh, that’s what I got for the horsehide I sold last night.”

“Heavens above! How the price of hides must have gone up.” Big Claus ran home, took an ax, and knocked all four of his horses on the head. Then he ripped their hides off, and set out to town with them.

“Hides, hides! Who’ll buy hides?” he bawled, up and down the streets. All the shoemakers and tanners came running to ask what their price was. “A bushel of money apiece, ” he told them.

“Are you crazy?” they asked. “Do you think we spend money by the bushel?”

“Hides, hides! Who’ll buy hides?” he kept on shouting, and to those who asked how much, he said, “A bushel of money.”

“He takes us for fools,” they said. The shoemakers took their straps, and the tanners their leather aprons, and they beat Big Claus through the town.

“Hides, hides!” they mocked him. “We’ll tan your hide for you if you don’t get out of town.” Big Claus had to run as fast as he could. He had never been beaten so badly.

“Little Claus will pay for this,” he said when he got back home. “I’ll kill him for it.”

Now it so happened that Little Claus’s old grandmother had just died. She had been as cross as could be-never a kind word did she have for him-but he was sorry to see her die. He put the dead woman in his own warm bed, just in case she came to life again, and let her lie there all night while he napped in a chair in the corner, as he had done so often before.

As he sat there in the night, the door opened and in came Big Claus with an ax. He knew exactly where Little Claus’s bed was, so he went straight to it and knocked the dead grandmother on the head, under the impression that she was Little Claus.

“There,” he said, “You won’t fool me again.” Then he went home.

“What a wicked man,” said Little Claus. “Why, he would have killed me. It’s lucky for my grandmother that she was already dead, or he’d have been the death of her.”

He dressed up his old grandmother in her Sunday best, borrowed a neighbor’s horse, and hitched up his cart. On the back seat he propped up his grandmother, wedged in so that the jolts would not topple her over, and away they went through the forest.

When the sun came up they drew abreast of a large inn, where Little Claus halted and went in to get him some breakfast. The innkeeper was a wealthy man, and a good enough fellow in his way, but his temper was as fiery as if he were made of pepper and snuff.

“Good morning,” he said to Little Claus. “You’re up and dressed mighty early.”

“Yes,” said Little Claus. “I am bound for the town with my old grandmother, who is sitting out there in the cart. I can’t get her to come in, but you might take her a glass of mead. You’ll have to shout to make her hear you, for she’s deaf as a post.”

“I’ll take it right out.” The innkeeper poured a glass full of mead and took it to the dead grandmother, who sat stiffly on the cart.

“Your grandson sent you a glass of mead,” said the innkeeper, but the dead woman said never a word. She just sat there.

“Don’t you hear me?” the innkeeper shouted his loudest. “Here’s a glass of mead from your grandson.”

Time after time he shouted it, she didn’t budge. He flew into such a rage that he threw the glass in her face. The mead splashed all over her as she fell over backward, for she was just propped up, not tied in place.

“Confound it!” Little Claus rushed out the door and took the innkeeper by the throat. “You’ve gone and killed my grandmother. Look! There’s a big hole in her forehead.”

“Oh, what a calamity!” The innkeeper wrung his hands. “And all because of my fiery temper. Dear Little Claus, I’ll give you a bushel of money, and I’ll bury your grandmother as if she were my very own. But you must hush this thing up for me, or they’ll chop off my head-how I’d hate it.”

So it came about that Little Claus got another bushel of money, and the landlord buried the old grandmother as if she’d been his own.

Just as soon as Little Claus got home, he sent a boy to borrow a bushel measure from Big Claus.

“Little Claus wants to borrow it?” Big Claus asked. “Didn’t I kill him? I’ll go and see about that.” So he himself took the measure over to Little Claus.

“Where did you get all that money?” he asked when he saw the height of the money pile.

“When you killed my grandmother instead of me,” Little Claus told him, “I sold her for a bushel of money,”

“Heavens above! That was indeed a good price,” said Big Claus. He hurried home, took an ax, and knocked his old grandmother on the head. Then he put her in a cart, drove off to town, and asked the apothecary if he wanted to buy a dead body.

“Whose dead body?” asked the apothecary. “Where’d you get it?”

“It’s my grandmother’s dead body. I killed her for a bushel of money,” Big Claus told him.

“Lord,” said the apothecary. “Man, you must be crazy. Don’t talk like that or they’ll chop off your head.” Then he told him straight he had done a wicked deed, that he was a terrible fellow, and that the worst of punishments was much too good for him. Big Claus got frightened. He jumped in his cart, whipped up the horses, and drove home as fast as they would take him. The apothecary and everyone else thought he must be a madman, so they didn’t stand in his way.

“I’ll see that you pay for this,” said Big Claus when he reached the highroad. “Oh, won’t I make you pay for this, Little Claus!” The moment he got home he took the biggest sack he could find, went to see Little Claus, and said:

“You’ve deceived me again. First I killed my four horses. Then I killed my old grandmother, and it’s all your fault. But I’ll make sure you don’t make a fool of me again.” Then he caught Little Claus and put him in the sack, slung it up over his back and told him, “Now I shall take you and drown you.”

“It was a long way to the river, and Little Claus was no light load. The road went by the church, and as they passed they could hear the organ playing and the people singing very beautifully. Big Claus set down his sack just outside the church door. He thought the best thing for him to do was to go in to hear a hymn before he went any further. Little Claus was securely tied in the sack, and all the people were inside the church. So Big Claus went in too.

“Oh dear, oh dear!” Little Claus sighed in the sack. Twist and turn as he might, he could not loosen the knot. Then a white-haired old cattle drover came by, leaning heavily on his staff. The herd of bulls and cows he was driving bumped against the sack Little Claus was in, and overturned it.

“Oh dear,” Little Claus sighed, “I’m so young to be going to Heaven.”

“While I,” said the cattle drover,” am too old for this earth, yet Heaven will not send for me.”

“Open the sack!” Little Claus shouted. “Get in and take my place. You’ll go straight to Heaven.”

“That’s where I want to be, said the drover, as he undid the sack. Little Claus jumped out at once. “You must look after my cattle,” the old man said as he crawled in. As soon as Little Claus fastened the sack, he walked away from there with all the bulls and cows.

Presently Big Claus came out of church. He took the sack on his back and found it light, for the old drover was no more than half as heavy as Little Claus.

“How light my burden is, all because I’ve been listening to a hymn,” said Big Claus. He went on to the deep wide river, and threw the sack with the old cattle drover into the water.

“You’ll never trick me again,” Big Claus said, for he thought he had seen the last splash of Little Claus.

He started home, but when he came to the crossroads he met Little Claus and all his cattle.

“Where did you come from?” Big Claus exclaimed. “Didn’t I just drown you?”

“Yes,” said Little Claus. “You threw me in the river half an hour ago.”

“Then how did you come by such a fine herd of cattle?” Big Claus wanted to know.

“Oh, they’re sea cattle,” said Little Claus. “I’ll tell you how I got them, because I’m obliged to you for drowning me. I’m a made man now. I can’t begin to tell you how rich I am.

“But when I was in the sack, with the wind whistling in my ears as you dropped me off the bridge into the cold water, I was frightened enough. I went straight to the bottom, but it didn’t hurt me because of all the fine soft grass down there. Someone opened the sack and a beautiful maiden took my hand. Her clothes were white as snow, and she had a green wreath in her floating hair. She said, ‘So you’ve come, Little Claus. Here’s a herd of cattle for you, but they are just the beginning of my presents. A mile further up the road another herd awaits you.’

“Then I saw that the river is a great highway for the people who live in the sea. Down on the bottom of the river they walked and drove their cattle straight in from the sea to the land where the rivers end. The flowers down there are fragrant. The grass is fresh, and fish flit by as birds do up here. The people are fine, and so are the cattle that come grazing along the roadside.”

“Then why are you back so soon?” Big Claus asked. “If it’s all so beautiful, I’d have stayed there.”

“Well,” said Little Claus, “I’m being particularly clever. You remember I said the sea maiden told me to go one mile up the road and I’d find another herd of cattle. By ‘road’ she meant the river, for that’s the only way she travels. But I know how the river turns and twists, and it seemed too roundabout a way of getting there. By coming up on land I took a short cut that saves me half a mile. So I get my cattle that much sooner.”

“You are a lucky man,” said Big Claus, “Do you think I would get me some cattle too if I went down to the bottom of the river?”

“Oh, I’m sure you would,” said Little Claus. “Don’t expect me to carry you there in a sack, because you’re too heavy for me, but if you walk to the river and crawl into the sack, I’ll throw you in with the greatest of pleasure.”

“Thank you,” said Big Claus, “but remember, if I don’t get a herd of sea cattle down there, I’ll give you a thrashing, believe me.”

“Would you really?” said Little Claus.

As they came to the river, the thirsty cattle saw the water and rushed to drink it. Little Claus said, “See what a hurry they are in to get back to the bottom of the river.”

“Help me get there first,” Big Claus commanded, ” or I’ll give you that beating right now.” He struggled into the big sack, which had been lying across the back of one of the cattle. “Put a stone in, or I’m afraid I shan’t sink,” said Big Claus.

“No fear of that,” said Little Claus, but he put a big stone in the sack, tied it tightly, and pushed it into the river.

Splash! Up flew the water and down to the bottom sank Big Claus.

“I’m afraid he won’t find what I found!” said Little Claus as he herded all his cattle home.

 

 


The Story in Popular Culture

 


Little Claus and Big Claus in Print

Several new editions of “The Brave (or Steadfast) Tin Soldier” have appeared recently, and many are very nicely illustrated by contemporary artists. These are some of the ones that look interesting to me. One of the them is a pop-up book and the last one is free for Kindle. You can also perform a search for The Brave Tin Soldier here.

 






Illustrations From Around the World


Little Claus and Big Claus on Stamps


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This Fairy Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Walter Crane from the Fairy Tales and Other Stories, 1874. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Fairy Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.
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This Fable is Intended For You

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Hans Christian Anderson

 


This Fable is Intended For You

Wise men of ancient times ingeniously discovered how to tell people the truth without being blunt to their faces. You see, they held a magic mirror before the people, in which all sorts of animals and various wondrous things appeared, producing amusing as well as instructive pictures. They called these fables, and whatever wise or foolish deeds the animals performed, the people were to imagine themselves in their places and thereby think, “This fable is intended for you!” In this way no one’s feelings were hurt. Let us give you an example.

There were two high mountains, and at the top of each stood a castle. In the valley below ran a hungry dog, sniffing along the ground as if in search of mice or quail. Suddenly a trumpet sounded from one of the castles, to announce that mealtime was approaching. The dog immediately started running up the mountain, hoping to get his share; but when he was halfway up, the trumpeter ceased blowing, and a trumpet from the other castle commenced. “Up here,” thought the dog, “they will have finished eating before I arrive, but over there they are just getting ready to eat.” So he ran down, and up the other mountain. But now the first trumpet started again, while the second stopped. The dog ran down again, and up again; and this he continued until both trumpets stopped blowing, and the meals were over in both castles.

Now guess what the wise men of ancient times would have said about this fable, and who the fool could be who runs himself ragged without gaining anything, either here or there?


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This Fairy Tales page was created by Katrina Haney, author, creative writer, ghost writer and all-around content writer. Illustrations by Walter Crane from the Fairy Tales and Other Stories, 1874. Please feel free to save, print or share this post with your friends or social communities. For more Fairy Tales posts , as well as other awesome information about books, words, writing and reading, please visit Katrina’s website at www.katrinahaney.com.

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